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His publications consist of articles and chapters in anthologies such as The Routledge Companion to Video Game Studies (Routledge, forthcoming), Encyclopedia of Video Games: The Culture, Technology, and Art of Gaming (ABC-Clio, 2012), Horror Video Games: Essays on the Fusion of Fear and Play (Mc Farland, 2009), The Video Game Theory Reader 2 (Routledge, 2009), and The Video Game Explosion: A History From PONG to Play Station and Beyond (Greenwood Press, 2008). The paper offers a short history of the origins and the establishment of the Japanese video game industry (from 1973 to 1983). It was through the already established Japanese electronics and toy corporations that the arcade, home console, and personal computer markets were established. Then, the examination focus on the implementation of these three sectors in the Japanese video game industry, which have, each in their own way, deeply affected the evolution of video games, not only in Japan, but also in international markets. The economic development of Japan after the war, which has led to the arrival and the success of the Japanese video game industry, is large and complex. However, we can highlight some foundational events, as some key industries were developed that have had, at one time or another, significant influences on the arrival and the development of the video game industry, such as the successful household electrical appliances industry (Yoshimi, 1999) and the computer industry (Nakayama & Yoshioka, 2006).

Keywords: Japan, history, industry, arcade, home console, PC, Geemu A common discourse about Japanese video games and the contribution of Japan to the video game industry as a whole is to tie them to the development of a global and hybrid industry. Like Aoyama and Izushi already attested, the evolution of the Japanese video game market is linked to a specific economic and cultural context: We argue that the cross-sectoral transfer of skills occurs differently depending on national contexts, such as the social legitimacy and strength of preexisting industries, the socioeconomic status of entrepreneurs or pioneer firms in an emerging industry, and the sociocultural cohesiveness between the preexisting and emerging industries.